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Monday Mutant 24: Straight and Arrow (indirect)

In this Straight and Arrow puzzle, a number followed by a question mark represents how many black cells are in at least one of the four orthogonal directions (that is, the question mark can be replaced by an up arrow, a down arrow, a left arrow, or a right arrow, and be a normal Straight and Arrow clue). A number followed by an x means that none of the four orthogonal directions contain that many black cells. A number followed by a plus sign represents the total number of black cells in all four orthogonal directions. The rules are otherwise unchanged.
I plagiarized -- I mean stole -- I mean borrowed this mutant idea from MellowMelon.
ERRATUM: Sheesh, at this rate, my blog will have more errata than MellowMelon's blog and The Griddle combined by the end of the year! Due to my brain not working 100% properly, this puzzle had multiple solutions. . . until now.

Monday Mutant 23: Room and Reason (symmetry)

In this Room and Reason puzzle, a room with an S in it must have 180-degree rotational symmetry, and a room with an A in it must NOT have 180-degree rotational symmetry. The rules are otherwise unchanged.
Remember kids: the letter S stands for "symmetry" and has 180-degree rotational symmetry, and the letter A stands for "asymmetry" and doesn't have 180-degree rotational symmetry.

Monday Mutant 22: Battleships (Shinro)

Ten ships (as indicated below the grid: one four-cell ship, two three-cell ships, three two-cell ships, and four one-cell ships) are hidden in the grid. The ships may be rotated from the orientations shown, but may not overlap or occupy cells which share a corner or an edge. A number to the right of a row or below a column indicates how many cells in that row or column are occupied by ships. No cell containing an arrow may contain part of a ship, but every arrow must point to at least one ship segment in that row, column, or diagonal (although not every ship segment needs to have an arrow pointing to it). Locate the ships.
This variant is inspired by a puzzle called Shinro, a puzzle apparently of Japanese origins.

Puzzle 415: Room and Reason 28

Expect to see a good number of these as long as I have the book Heyawake Maru unfinished; solving the puzzles contained therein has definitely inspired me to create more of my own. :)

Monday Mutant 21: Polyominous / Battleships

Ten ships (as indicated below the grid: one four-cell ship, two three-cell ships, three two-cell ships, and four one-cell ships) are hidden in the grid. The ships may be rotated from the orientations shown (without changing the numbers), but may not overlap or occupy cells which share a corner or an edge. A number to the right of a row or below a column indicates how many cells in that row or column are occupied by ships. The numbers on these ships also function as clues in a Polyominous puzzle. None of the numbers already present in the grid are part of the ships. Locate the ships and solve the Polyominous puzzle.
Today's Monday Mutant was inspired by the ever-so-inspirational Thomas Snyder.

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