Wordy Wednesday 59: Divided Into 100 Cells & Wordy Wednesday 60: Pent Words 12

WORDY WEDNESDAY #57
WORDS WITHOUT FRIENDS 2 (answer)
It's been two weeks, so time to unveil the answer to this puzzle. If you still wish to solve it yourself, please go here for the game version, here for the normal version of the puzzle, or here for the easier version of the puzzle. Here's a list of people who solved it:
Christian Parker 618 **
Adam Weaver [no score] **
John Bulten [no score] **
Mark Tilford [no score] **
Ryan Faley [no score] **
Sam Levitin [no score] *
Note: As of this writing, Mark Tilford used the computer program he used for Words Without Friends to generate some solutions to the game, but he forgot to adjust the number of turns from 16 to 15, and the game he submitted didn't score over 597 points within the first 15 turns.

WORDY WEDNESDAY #58
W_ _D S_ _RCH (hint)
As of this writing, only 3 people have solved last week's puzzle. Haven't solved it yet? Here's a very blatant hint. Send your solutions to glmathgrant[at]gmail[dot]com within the next week to appear on the solvers list and be recognized for your puzzle prowess. Good luck, solvers!

WORDY WEDNESDAY #59
DIVIDED INTO 100 CELLS
Draw a single path of horizontal and vertical segments that returns to where it started, and which passes through all of the cells exactly once (with the exception of cells containing the letter E, which may not be passed through). See the example on the right.
Quantity __ __ __ __ __ ___
         F6 B8 A2 F2 H6 I10
Television series exposing unfaithful significant others __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __
                                                         I2 C9 A5 B3 I7 E3 D8 E7
Irish ____ (popular cocktail) __ __ __ __ __ ___
                              A6 B2 G4 G9 C1 J10
Hardly wise __ __ __ __ __ __ __
            J8 F8 H8 H1 D7 I4 E4
Television series set in Kitchen Stadium: 2 wds. __ __ __ __ __ __ ___ __
                                                 D9 G1 C2 C4 F3 I9 G10 F9
An Old Testament prophet __ __ __ __ __ __
                         F4 B9 G2 H9 C6 I8
Rocket's platform __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __
                  E9 H4 J3 D5 F5 G3 J4 B7 E1
It's divided into parishes __ __ __ __ __ __ __ ___ __
                           B6 F1 A4 J2 H5 A9 G8 F10 G6
Phonograph part __ __ __ __ __ ___
                D4 J6 C8 C7 I5 C10
Mozart's Don Giovanni, for one ___ __ __ __ __
                               A10 B1 J1 C3 J5
Yellowish-green tropical fruit __ __ __ __ __ __
                               A3 D1 A8 J7 H2 D3
Didn't attend, as class __ __ __ __ ___ __ __
                        G7 I1 D6 A1 D10 H3 I6
Serene __ __ __ ___ __ __ ___ __
       G5 E6 B5 B10 I3 H7 E10 D2
Russian ____ (borzoi) __ __ __ ___ __ __ __ __ __
                      E5 E8 B4 H10 A7 J9 C5 E2 F7


WORDY WEDNESDAY #60
PENT WORDS 12

In this puzzle, you must divide the grid into pentominoes (regions containing five cells each), and write a letter in each cell. The rows, reading from left to right, will contain the words hinted at by the ACROSS clues. The letters in the pentominoes, in reading order (left to right starting with the top row), will form the words hinted at by the PENTOMINOES clues; these clues are presented in no particular order. (In the example above, the rows spell PLANT, SHARE, and BITES, and the pentominoes spell the words PLANS, TREES, and HABIT.) Use the ACROSS answers to determine where the pentominoes are.
ACROSS (two answers per row):
1 Item under a pillow, sometimes / ____ and dangerous
2 Not wordy / Pertaining to the schnoz
3 ____ and Omega (2010 film) / Yankee catcher in the National Baseball Hall of Fame
4 Cognizant / Retail chain for which Rosie O'Donnell was a spokesperson
5 Gray who played Sue Ellen Ewing on Dallas / Jules Verne's genre: hyph.
6 Deadly / Place for a sensei
7 More aged / It shades your eyes
8 Glass-cleaning brand / "Breaking Up Is ____ to Do" (Neil Sedaka song)
9 Jonah's successor / Orson Scott Card title character
10 Canis latrans, more familiarly / "Muskrat ____"

PENTOMINOES:
* HALF OF THE FINAL ANSWER
* THE OTHER HALF OF THE FINAL ANSWER
* 16:9, for example
* Gold, silver, or bronze Olympic prize
* ____ Divas (reality television series)
* Roman gladiators fought in one
* Handle skillfully, as a weapon
* Operated a car
* "A rose by any ____ name. . ."
* Burn, as boiling water might
* Winner of the first Academy Award for Best Animated Feature
* Red ____ (raccoon relative)
* Varanasi's country
* Permit
* Lion's ____
* Maid Marian of Disney's Robin Hood, for one
* ____ Will Be Blood (2007 film)
* Sword with a curved blade
* Dr. Leonard with the nickname "Bones"
* Norwegian geographical feature

COMING NEXT WEEK. . .
* My take on a puzzle that dates back to 2010 (and whose website has ceased to exist, suggesting that the author didn't find much success with it).
* Patron Puzzle #3, which will be delivered exclusively to Patreon supporters ($5 or more per month), is a Siamese Twins crossword. 112 entries are to be entered into two 13x13 crossword grids; you must figure out which clue goes to which grid.

Until next time, yappy solving!

Wordy Wednesday 58: W_ _D S_ _RCH

WORDY WEDNESDAY #56
SECTION SIX 5 (answer)
It's been two weeks, so time to unveil the answer to this puzzle. If you still wish to solve it yourself, please go here for the normal version of the puzzle, or here for the easier version of the puzzle. Here's a list of people who solved it:
Giovanni Pagano **
Jack Bross **
M. Sean Molley **
Peter Abide **
Adam Weaver **
Ben Carter *
Bryce Herdt **
John Bulten **
Mark Tilford **
Matt Burkemper **
Ryan Faley **
Sam Levitin **

WORDY WEDNESDAY #57
WORDS WITHOUT FRIENDS 2 (hint)
5 people have solved the puzzle version of last week's puzzle, and 1 person has scored over 597 points on the game version. Haven't solved it yet? Here's an easier version of the puzzle version. Send your solutions to glmathgrant[at]gmail[dot]com within the next week to appear on the solvers list and be recognized for your puzzle prowess. Good luck, solvers!

WORDY WEDNESDAY #58
W⃞⃞D S⃞⃞RCH
To some people, the grid below will look like a mess of random words; to others, it will look like a mess of random letters. But it is most usefully viewed as a combination of both.
The answer is a single word (but not one of the words on the list below).
ABSENT, ALONE, AVOCADO, BEING, BEVIES, BRAVO, BREAD, BROTHER, CARGO, CHALICE, CLAIM, COBRA, CORGI, DEARIE, FREEDOM, FUTON, GOOSE, GYRE, HEEL, HEFTY, HERESY, LICORICE, MOVIE, ORPHAN, PHONE, REBORN, REMOTE, RIFE, RINSE, SEEM, SOCIAL, SPIFF, SPOIL, VERB, YODEL

REDHEAD64'S OBSCURE PUZZLE BLOG!
Ryan "Redhead64" Faley would probably like you to visit his blog and solve his latest Pent Words. Be warned: if you're not familiar with your pop culture and video games, you'll be looking things up all over the place (or giving up).

COMING NEXT WEEK. . .
* A logic puzzle you will solve with E's. . . or rather, without them! Oh, and there are words, too.
* It's the fifth Wednesday of the month, so you get a double feature! Pent Words 12 includes guest appearances from Rosie O'Donnell, Neil Sedaka, and Orson Scott Card!

Until next time, yappy solving!

Wordy Wednesday 57: Words Without Friends 2

WORDY WEDNESDAY #55
PENT WORDS 11 (answer)
It's been two weeks, so time to unveil the answer to this puzzle. If you still wish to solve it yourself, please go here for the normal version of the puzzle, or here for the easier version of the puzzle. Here's a list of people who solved it:
Giovanni Pagano **
Jack Bross **
M. Sean Molley **
Peter Abide **
Adam Weaver **
Bryce Herdt **
John Bulten **
Mark Tilford **
Matt Burkemper *
Michael Madsen **
Ryan Faley **
Sam Levitin **

WORDY WEDNESDAY #56
SECTION SIX 5 (hint)
11 people have solved last week's puzzle. Haven't solved it yet? Here's an easier version. Send your solutions to glmathgrant[at]gmail[dot]com within the next week to appear on the solvers list and be recognized for your puzzle prowess. Good luck, solvers!

WORDY WEDNESDAY #57
WORDS WITHOUT FRIENDS 2

This game of word solitaire is inspired by Solicross. Actually, it is Solicross. Don't sue me, Dell.

You have 15 turns to score as many points as possible by building words on the grid. Start by taking the first 7 letters from the LETTER LIST. Form an English word using two or more letters, and place it reading across (from left to right) or down (from top to bottom) in the grid, either starting in or ending in the shaded cell. On each successive turn, cross out the letters you used and replace them with the next letters from the LETTER LIST, and then play a new word using some or all of those letters. As in Scrabble, you can play at right angles to a previous word (either incorporating a letter from it or expanding it) or parallel to a previous word, but must adjoin some previous word; adjoining letters must always form words in crossword fashion, and all letters used in a single turn must be part of a single word.

Every turn, you score for the words you made on that turn. The score for a word is the sum of all the numbers it covers (whether those letters were played on that turn or not); multiple words formed in a single turn are added up together (with shared letters counting twice). If you use all 60 letters within 15 turns, give yourself 50 extra points.

All words will be checked against http://www.m-w.com/scrabble. (This means you can use words like TE and GI that you couldn't use last time!)

Any score of over 597 points will be considered a solution to this “game version”. Follow this link for the “puzzle version”, which indicates where to place the tiles to score exactly 597 points; you must merely figure out which words to form each turn.


COMING NEXT WEEK. . .
* A puzzle I wrote back in 2013! You know it must be a good puzzle if it hasn't seen the light of day for two years!

Until next time, yappy solving!

Wordy Wednesday 56: Section Six 5

WORDY WEDNESDAY #54
SUDOKUROSSWORD (answer)
It's been two weeks, so time to unveil the answer to this puzzle. If you still wish to solve it yourself, please go here for the puzzle, or here for a hint. Here's a list of people who solved it:
Brian Michalowski **
Giovanni Pagano **
Jack Bross **
Jack Lance **
Peter Abide **
Adam Weaver **
Bo Green *
Bryce Herdt **
Izak Bulten *
John Bulten *
Kou T. **
Mark Tilford **
Michael Madsen **
Ryan Faley **
Sam Levitin **
yyw **

WORDY WEDNESDAY #55
PENT WORDS 11 (hint)
11 people have solved last week's puzzle. Haven't solved it yet? Here's an easier version. Send your solutions to glmathgrant[at]gmail[dot]com within the next week to appear on the solvers list and be recognized for your puzzle prowess. Good luck, solvers!

WORDY WEDNESDAY #56
SECTION SIX 5
This puzzle's grid has six rings and six sections. Each ring contains a series of words placed end to end, reading either clockwise or counterclockwise; all the words in a given ring will read in the same direction. Ring 1 (the outer ring) contains six answers that read clockwise; the starting spaces are numbered in the grid. Clues for the answers in the remaining rings are given in order, but their starting points and direction are for you to determine. The sections (separated by the heavy lines radiating from the center) will help you place the inner rings: in a given section, each ring segment contains all but one of the letters in the next segment outward. In other words, a section's outermost segment contains six letters; the next segment inward contains five of those six letters in some order; and so on, until only one of the original six letters remains.

Arrange the letters in the six starred spaces to form the final answer.

Ring 1
1 First letter of the first 8 verses of Psalm 119, in Hebrew
2 What two rays sharing a vertex form
3 Fire starter, often
4 Rub out
5 Abrupt in an unfriendly manner
6 Type of number FedEx might give you

Ring 2
* Green ____ (sitcom starring Eddie Albert and Eva Gabor)
* Consume heartily, as an alcoholic beverage
* It may be made of pith
* Member of a shapeshifting race in My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic (Ryan Faley, this clue's for you)
* Cobain of Nirvana

Ring 3
* Filling holes, perhaps
* The outer layer of a tooth
* Irritate, perhaps
* Jonny of Hanna-Barbera cartoons

Ring 4
* Famous antivirus brand
* Crouch
* Ancestry

Ring 5
* Website offering walkthroughs and cheats
* Long, bushy fox feature

Ring 6
* A bad reputation, for example

COMING NEXT WEEK. . .
* A sequel to a certain Wordy Wednesday involving a 9x9 grid and a bunch of numbers. It'll be on time, too!


Until next time, yappy solving!

Wordy Wednesday 55: Pent Words 11

WORDY WEDNESDAY #53
CROSSWORD OF MORE INTEGERS (answer)
It's been two weeks, so time to unveil the answer to this puzzle. If you still wish to solve it yourself, please go here for the normal version of the puzzle, or here for a hint. Here's a list of people who solved it:
Giovanni Pagano **
Jack Bross **
Peter Abide *
Adam Weaver **
Bryce Herdt *
Jack Lance **
John Bulten **
Mark Tilford **
Neelix **
Ryan Faley **
Sam Levitin **
yyw **

WORDY WEDNESDAY #54
SUDOKUROSSWORD (hint)
12 people have solved last week's puzzle. Haven't solved it yet? Here's a hint. Send your solutions to glmathgrant[at]gmail[dot]com within the next week to appear on the solvers list and be recognized for your puzzle prowess. Good luck, solvers!

WORDY WEDNESDAY #55
PENT WORDS 11
In this puzzle, you must divide the grid into pentominoes (regions containing five cells each), and write a letter in each cell. The rows, reading from left to right, will contain the words hinted at by the ACROSS clues. The letters in the pentominoes, in reading order (left to right starting with the top row), will form the words hinted at by the PENTOMINOES clues; these clues are presented in no particular order. (In the example above, the rows spell PLANT, SHARE, and BITES, and the pentominoes spell the words PLANS, TREES, and HABIT.) Use the ACROSS answers to determine where the pentominoes are.
ACROSS (two answers per row):
1 Japan's and Canada's are red and white / O'Hara who voiced Belle in Beauty and the Beast
2 Rick of Saddleback Church / Nuisance
3 Employ / Acceptable
4 Emulates Romeo, perhaps / It hangs off a roof
5 Word on a wanted poster / What a closed fist might represent
6 Lynde of The Hollywood Squares / Mistake-accompanying interjection
7 Be a temptress / Trendy
8 New England team, colloquially / One in a bank, perhaps
9 Move a large piece of furniture, say / With The, film starring John Wayne as Davy Crockett
10 Mock, as an opponent / "God ____ the USA"

PENTOMINOES:
* HALF OF THE FINAL ANSWER
* THE OTHER HALF OF THE FINAL ANSWER
* ____ 2000 (short-lived game show with The Creature instead of Bankrupt)
* Robin Hood's weapon of choice
* Ganders, for example
* Walk casually
* Arduous journeys
* Sag
* Tear producers
* Destruction and chaos
* Weapon with a spiked ball on a chain on a stick
* ____ Chocula
* Posthumous Janis Joplin album
* Santiago is its capital
* "The ____ that refreshes" (old Coca-Cola slogan)
* A sheriff might have one
* Nation bordering Portugal
* Sum
* "____ in the World Is Carmen Sandiego?"
* Macaroni, for example

PATREON UPDATE!
With 11 patrons giving $52 per month, I have reached my first Milestone Goal, and now I will start posting an extra Wordy Wednesday on the fifth Wednesday of every month with five Wednesdays! Those of you keeping score at home might note that this means, for the first time in this blog's history, there will be two Pent Words puzzles in the same month! Patrons also gain early access to the Wordy Wednesday puzzles and exclusive monthly Patron Puzzles, so if you want to make a monthly contribution to my tip jar, don't be shy. And if you don't want to make such a contribution, don't worry, I promise to keep these sales pitches minimal and only mostly annoying. :)


COMING NEXT WEEK. . .
* A very special puzzle that I hope Ryan Faley gets "around" to solving. (Speaking of Ryan Faley, his latest puzzle is a second Charadagrams inspired by one of my previous Wordy Wednesdays, so you may be interested in it.)


Until next time, yappy solving!

Wordy Wednesday 54: Sudokurossword

WORDY WEDNESDAY #52
DECK DYNASTY (answer)
It's been two weeks, so time to unveil the answer to this puzzle. If you still wish to solve it yourself, please go here for the normal version of the puzzle, or here for the easier version of the puzzle. Here's a list of people who solved it:
Giovanni Pagano **
Jack Bross **
Peter Abide *
Adam Weaver **
Bryce Herdt **
Jack Lance **
John Bulten *
Mark Tilford **
Ryan Faley **
Sam Levitin **

WORDY WEDNESDAY #53
CROSSWORD OF MORE INTEGERS (hint)
10 people have solved last week's puzzle. Haven't solved it yet? Here are three letters to get you started. Send your solutions to glmathgrant[at]gmail[dot]com within the next week to appear on the solvers list and be recognized for your puzzle prowess. Good luck, solvers!

WORDY WEDNESDAY #54
SUDOKUROSSWORD
This puzzle comes in two parts. The first part is a sudoku, which you solve normally (the numbers 1-9 appear once in each row, column, and 3x3 box). Each row has a crossword clue next to it; the shaded cell corresponds to the crossword entry in which that answer belongs. (For example, a 5 means that the answer to that clue belongs in 5-Down in the crossword grid.) If you want to really challenge yourself, you can skip the sudoku entirely and try to fit in the crossword answers without knowing where they're supposed to go, but Ryan Faley wouldn't recommend that, and you won't get an extra star for doing so.

Anagram the highlighted letters in the crossword to obtain the final answer word.
RANDOM UPDATE: AN UN-TALENT CONTEST!
Do you have talent? No? Good! Please consider entering my BoardGameGeek's Not Talent contest on BoardGameGeek and posting a video of your lack of talent. So far, the only entrant is. . . me, with a video of an ambitious card routine that will leave you the exact opposite of speechless. Come on, guys! I want to see more entries! Whether your lack of talent involves singing poorly, dancing terribly, failing at magic, horrible stand-up comedy, or anything that you'd expect to see on America's Got Talent (except done better), I would love to see it. Once (if?) there are other entries, you can give them your thumbs up if you detect talent in them; the entry with the fewest thumbs wins!

COMING NEXT WEEK. . .
* What's a 5-letter word for "____ 2000 (short-lived game show with The Creature instead of Bankrupt)"?
* Patron Puzzle #2, which will be delivered exclusively to Patreon supporters ($5 or more per month), is a Snake Crisscross, a puzzle type which (as far as I can tell) was invented by my good friend Craig Kasper. Crisscross words read from left to right or top to bottom as you'd expect; snake words read along bendy paths in the grid. Every letter is used in one snake word and one or two crisscross words; there are 85 words in all.

Until next time, yappy solving!

Wordy Wednesday 53: Crossword of More Integers

WORDY WEDNESDAY #51
CRYPTOGRAM FUN PACK (answer)
It's been two weeks, so time to unveil the answer to this puzzle. If you still wish to solve it yourself, please go here for the puzzle, or here for hints. Here's a list of people who solved it:
Giovanni Pagano **
Jack Bross **
Adam Weaver **
Bryce Herdt **
Izak Bulten *
Jack Lance **
John Bulten *
Kou T. **
Mark Tilford **
Neelix *
Ryan Faley **
Sam Levitin **

WORDY WEDNESDAY #52
DECK DYNASTY (hint)
9 people have solved last week's puzzle. Haven't solved it yet? Here's an easier version. Send your solutions to glmathgrant[at]gmail[dot]com within the next week to appear on the solvers list and be recognized for your puzzle prowess. Good luck, solvers!

WORDY WEDNESDAY #53
CROSSWORD OF MORE INTEGERS
In the crossword puzzle above, every letter is represented by an integer from 1 through 26. You must decipher the code to reveal the words. Once you're done, look for the puzzle's final answer, a nine-letter word (which isn't one of the three nine-letter words in the completed crossword).

COMING NEXT WEEK. . .
* An adaptation of one of Ryan Faley's ideas!

Until next time, yappy solving!

Wordy Wednesday 52: Deck Dynasty

WORDY WEDNESDAY #51
CRYPTOGRAM FUN PACK! (hints)
9 people have solved last week's puzzle. Haven't solved it yet? Here are some hints. (These hints just might help you be a better cryptogram solver in general.) Send your solutions to glmathgrant[at]gmail[dot]com within the next week to appear on the solvers list and be recognized for your puzzle prowess. Good luck, solvers!

WORDY WEDNESDAY #52
DECK DYNASTY
 
A. Charles who founded a brokerage firm                 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
                                                         ♠       ♡   ♣   ♢
2. Wastefully luxurious                                 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
                                                             ♠   ♢   ♡       ♣
3. Setting for Ang Lee's “Eat Drink Man Woman”          ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
                                                             ♣   ♢   ♡       ♠
4. Nakedness                                            ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
                                                         ♢       ♠   ♡   ♣
5. ______ of S.H.I.E.L.D.                               ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
                                                         ♣   ♢       ♡   ♠
6. Explosive outburst                                   ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
                                                         ♡       ♠   ♢       ♣
7. Act like a sponge                                    ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
                                                         ♣           ♢   ♡   ♠
8. Kind thing to do with a rented VHS tape              ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
                                                         ♣   ♠       ♡   ♢
9. Basketballer Kevin, or a Bug- and Steel-type Pokémon ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
                                                         ♡   ♠       ♢       ♣
10. Extremely wide, as a hole                           ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
                                                         ♢       ♠       ♣   ♡
J. Small, pointy beard                                  ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
                                                             ♠   ♢       ♣   ♡
Q. Pierre de Fermat's was famously too small            ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
                                                         ♢       ♣       ♡   ♠
K. Small monkey which is used in medical research       ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
                                                             ♠   ♢   ♣       ♡


PATREON UPDATE
10 patrons on my Patreon are currently pledging a combined total of $51 a month. Assuming none of my patrons reduce or cancel their pledges before the end of the month, I will start posting an extra puzzle on every month with 5 Wednesdays (including this upcoming month of July). Truly, this is an exciting development.

If you hate pushy sales pitches, then don't worry; I don't plan on including a "Patreon update" in every post. I just wanted to announce that there might be more puzzles on this blog every so often. :)

COMING NEXT WEEK. . .
* Wordy Wednesday 53 tasks you with deciphering words, but this time, they're not in a sentence to help you out! Don't get cross!

Until next time, yappy solving!

Wordy Wednesday 51: Cryptogram Fun Pack!

WORDY WEDNESDAY #51
CRYPTOGRAM FUN PACK!

Solve these six cryptograms; each has its own code, and each has a six-letter word missing. Words that are always capitalized (such as proper names) are indicated with asterisks (*), and words that are capitalized because of their presence in a title are indicated by carats (^). For example, ^Sir *Isaac *Newton's favorite film is “^Gravity”. Fit the six missing words into the crisscross grid and anagram the highlighted letters into the final answer word.

1. ABCD'E DBF GCEDFED-HIJAKLH EMJID KL DBF AJINO? *K PFNKFQF *M. *D. *PCILRS AJRNO BCQF ECKO DBFIF'E C ______ PJIL FQFIT SKLRDF.

2. ABCCD ECFGHFH IJJK FL MECLKD *NGOPJQEIRJQL SGFP E ______ GIHFJEK LA *RLK, FGFQGIR GF "^FPJ ^OCJEFGLI LA E ^KEN".

3. ABACDEFGD HIFJK *LMCD *NFCOIFD'K IMPA; QA NACRFCPAG OQA FNAISIL KFIL RCFP OQA TUMKKST KSOTFP "^______".

4. ABCD EBFGA HIDHJID KIDJGEJAL MANOP ______ NIBOA; NODHL QBBGA HMIQRJAD *DPPBA EBI NOADILNBO NOLB LBJALDIA.

5. ABCDEFGHIAJKC CLMCC *FKCD *______ NBMC ECKLCO IEPCC QFLC HENRH HALGKIFBCNGHKS, RAIE BN TCNUFPOS IN EAH ECFKIE.

6. ABCDE FDCGA HIJBDE KBKEFBL EJHDLMKNKO PJNGM PDNFNKO, PJNQJ RHSME RMQJHKNQHG ______ CEHOM THD RBDM THUBDHIGM.

PATREON UPDATE
9 patrons on my Patreon are currently pledging a combined total of $46 a month. If this total hits $50 or more at the end of the month, then I will start posting an extra puzzle on every month with 5 Wednesdays (including this upcoming month of July)! That's 4 or 5 extra free puzzles per year! If you enjoy these puzzles, I hope you will consider supporting me on Patreon; with your monthly pledge, you get such perks as early access to the Wordy Wednesday puzzles (M. Sean Molley has already solved WW55 and WW56) and exclusive Patron Puzzles (Patron Puzzle #1, Bricks and Mortar, is going out today). Thank you!

COMING NEXT WEEK. . .
* Wordy Wednesday 52 revolves around six-letter words and playing cards, because those two things go together, apparently.

Until next time, yappy solving!

Patreon update!

As of this writing, 6 Patreon users are pledging me a combined total of $35 per month. Once I've reached $50 per month, I'll post 2 Wordy Wednesday puzzles on the fifth Wednesday of any month with five Wednesdays, allowing all of my readers (patrons and otherwise) to enjoy extra puzzles! By becoming a patron, you'll get early access to all of my Wordy Wednesday puzzles, plus access to exclusive puzzles, so I hope you'll consider pitching in.

Special thanks to Marquis2007 for coming through with some awesome foxger artwork which now adorns the left side of my blog. If you love cute foxes, but hate puzzles, you might consider commissioning Marquis2007 to draw something rather than becoming my patron. Also, you'll probably want to never visit this blog again, because very little of its content is foxes, and most of its content is puzzles.

COMING NEXT WEEK. . .
* Wordy Wednesday #51 will challenge your cryptogram-solving abilities!
* Patron Puzzle #1, which will be delivered exclusively to Patreon supporters ($5 or more per month), is a large Bricks and Mortar puzzle. Veterans of Penny Press publications (including the short-lived Will Shortz's Wordplay) may be familiar with Bricks and Mortar, which are normally 18x18 in size; this one's 24x24, and features 50 8-letter words for your solving pleasure!

Until next time, yappy solving!

Wordy Wednesday #50 update and a MAJOR ANNOUNCEMENT

WORDY WEDNESDAY #50
PENT WORDS 10 (answer)
It's been two weeks, so time to unveil the answer to this puzzle. If you still wish to solve it yourself, please go here for the normal version of the puzzle, or here for the easier version of the puzzle. Here's a list of people who solved it:
Adam Weaver **
Bryce Herdt **
Christian H.P. **
Edderiofer He *
Giovanni Pagano **
James McGowan **
Mark Tilford **
Peter Abide **
Ryan Faley **
Tim Harrod **
Sam Levitin **

Wordy Wednesday will resume next month, but first, I have a major announcement. . .

I plan on keeping the Wordy Wednesday series free for the foreseeable future, meaning everybody in the English-speaking world can enjoy a weekly dose of words without paying me a dime. However, if you would like to give me a monthly token of your appreciation, you can get some rewards! Let me explain. . .

While websites such as Kickstarter allow fans to pledge money one time to support one big project, with Patreon, you can pledge ongoing monthly support for someone who creates content on a regular basis. You get to choose how much money to give me every month: $1, $5, $42.01, whatever you think Wordy Wednesday is worth to you. In return, you'll get some nice rewards:

  • For $1 per month, you'll be recognized as a patron on this blog every time you solve a puzzle.
  • For $3 per month, you'll get early access to Wordy Wednesday puzzles.
  • For $5 per month, you'll get one bonus puzzle every month!
  • For $20 per month, you can almost boss me around and suggest words that I should include in future Wordy Wednesday puzzles! (Note: this reward tier is currently limited to two patrons, so hurry while supplies last!)
Your monthly pledge will put a smile on my face, and maybe even encourage me to write extra puzzles! For example, if my patrons pledge a combined $50 per month, I'll post TWO Wordy Wednesday puzzles on the fifth Wednesday of a month which has five Wednesdays! This coming July will be the first such month, FYI.

If you want to support me, or just read more detailed information, CLICK HERE to go to my Patreon page!

I hope to get your support. See you in June for Wordy Wednesday 51!

Wordy Wednesday #49 and #50 update

WORDY WEDNESDAY #49
WORDS WITHOUT FRIENDS (answer)
It's been two weeks, so time to unveil the answer to the hidden puzzle. If you still wish to solve it yourself, please go here. Here are the grids I received for the Words Without Friends game. Their scores are as follows:
James McGowan 521
Christian H.P. 504 *
Mark Tilford 437 *
Jack Lance 408
Adam Weaver 375 *
Giovanni Pagano [no score] *
Ivan Koswara [no score]
John Bulten [no score] **
Note: Ivan Koswara solved half of the hidden puzzle, but didn't find the instructions on how to extract the final answer. I'm giving him credit for 0-star completion.
Since I got so few solutions, I've decided to forego the random drawing: ALL solvers of the hidden puzzle (Adam Weaver, Christian H.P., Giovanni Pagano, John Bulten, and Mark Tilford) receive a signed copy of the last issue of Will Shortz's Wordplay, and ALL scores of over 350 (James McGowan, Christian H.P., Mark Tilford, Jack Lance, and Adam Weaver) get booby prizes!

WORDY WEDNESDAY #50
PENT WORDS 10 (hint)
10 people have solved last week's puzzle. Haven't solved it yet? Here's an easier version. Send your solutions to glmathgrant[at]gmail[dot]com within the next week to appear on the solvers list and be recognized for your puzzle prowess. Good luck, solvers!

Wordy Wednesday 51 will be posted soon, but at the present moment, I'm setting up. . . something. Expect an official announcement next week! (Those of you who follow me on social media may already know what it is. . . .)

A question about Ripple Effect (AKA Ripple Play)

I don't know if Erich Friedman's Math Magic allows user-submitted problems (otherwise, there might be way more problems than just one per month), but this problem is really nagging at me, having written some Ripple Effect puzzles recently for Grandmaster Puzzles. (Will they be used? Time will tell.)

What's the smallest rectangular Ripple Effect puzzle with a unique solution and no givens such that there's at least one region of size n? Does such a puzzle exist for every n? Here are examples for n=1,2,3,4,5:

Special thanks to Luke Pebody for supplying the solution for n=4, and Bryce Herdt for a solution for n=5 (which was obsoleted by Luke, but nonetheless helpful). What about for n>6?

Puzzle 618: Proof of Quilt 12

I wrote this puzzle last year for Grandmaster Puzzles, but Thomas Snyder doesn't really care for Shakashaka puzzles, so I've decided to finally post it here (just to prove my blog's title hasn't completely decayed). The last time I posted a large puzzle of this type, a reader helpfully provided a URL to play it online, and since I helpfully already had a plaintext version of the puzzle saved, I was able to generate such a URL myself. Play this puzzle on PUZ-PRE here!

A while back, I alluded to some changes in my life. I'm not quite sure what's going to happen; my computer hasn't been moved out yet, and it might end up staying here after all. This might mean more Wordy Wednesdays; I have a puzzle written that I don't think will be suitable for any other outlet (and will probably be Wordy Wednesday 51), and I really don't want to stop on a number like 51 if I can help it!
(click to enlarge)

Wordy Wednesday 50: Pent Words 10

WORDY WEDNESDAY #48
FRAMELINKS 2 (answer)
It's been two weeks, so time to unveil the answer to this puzzle. If you still wish to solve it yourself, please go here for the normal version of the puzzle, or here for the easier version of the puzzle. Here's a list of people who solved it:
Adam Weaver **
Bryce Herdt **
Christian H.P. **
Edderiofer He **
Frances Noga **
Giovanni Pagano **
Izak Bulten *
Jack Lance **
James McGowan **
John Bulten **
Kou T. *
Lewis Chen **
Mark Tilford **
Ryan Faley **
Sam Levitin **
Tim Harrod **

WORDY WEDNESDAY #49
WORDS WITHOUT FRIENDS
4 people have submitted scores of over 350 points for last week's puzzle. You have one week left to submit your score (or improve your existing one) and be entered to win some Pokémon cards as a booby prize.

Remember where I said that I got out of having to write an actual puzzle? I lied! There's actually a hidden puzzle here! So far, only 1 person has managed to find and solve this hidden puzzle: John Bulten! He will be receiving the actual prize: a signed copy of the final issue of Will Shortz's Wordplay! There will not be an easy version posted of this hidden puzzle; knowing the hidden puzzle exists is your easy version. Send your solutions to the hidden puzzle to glmathgrant[at]gmail[dot]com within the next week to be eligible to win another prize package!

WORDY WEDNESDAY #49.5
WORDS WITHOUT FRIENDS (OR POINTS)
Whether you enjoyed Words Without Friends or not, I hope you will enjoy this bonus puzzle I crafted. (There's no hidden puzzle here.)

Using the first rack of letters, form an English word and place it reading across (from left to right) or down (from top to bottom) in the grid, with one of the letters covering the shaded cell. On each successive turn, take the next rack of letters, and then play a new word using all of those letters. As in Scrabble, you can play at right angles to a previous word (either incorporating a letter from it or expanding it) or parallel to a previous word, but must adjoin some previous word; adjoining letters must always form words in crossword fashion, and all letters used in a single turn must be part of a single word. When you're finished, all 60 spaces in the grid will be used.

All words in my solution appear in Official Scrabble Players Dictionary Fourth Edition, the newest one I have. Aside from a few two-letter words and a former trademark (which I didn't realize isn't a trademark anymore), all words in my solution should be familiar to the typical English speaker.

WORDY WEDNESDAY #50
PENT WORDS 10
In this puzzle, you must divide the grid into pentominoes (regions containing five cells each), and write a letter in each cell. The rows, reading from left to right, will contain the words hinted at by the ACROSS clues. The letters in the pentominoes, in reading order (left to right starting with the top row), will form the words hinted at by the PENTOMINOES clues; these clues are presented in no particular order. (In the example above, the rows spell PLANT, SHARE, and BITES, and the pentominoes spell the words PLANS, TREES, and HABIT.) Use the ACROSS answers to determine where the pentominoes are.
ACROSS (two answers per row):
1 Gallows ____ / Howard Thurston's area of expertise
2 Printer paper purchase, often / ____ lizard
3 Fairy king in folklore / Use eBay, perhaps
4 Like the god Odin / Not above
5 Student at a military school / New ____, India
6 Drinking implement / Prices
7 Walk with confidence / Dance move
8 Dog voiced by Kevin Bacon / Annie Hall director's surname
9 Controlled, as a horse / Border
10 Time of fasting, for some / Border

PENTOMINOES:
* HALF OF THE FINAL ANSWER
* THE OTHER HALF OF THE FINAL ANSWER
* Beginning
* Move an inch
* A bad way to be buried
* Divine Comedy poet
* Prop for Yo-Yo Ma
* Taxonomic group between class and family
* Make up (for)
* It looks like a duck, but doesn't quack like a duck
* They protect broken bones
* Upright
* Getting older
* It glows in a fire
* Common piece of computer hardware
* Used up
* Flooded
* A Great Lake
* Play for time
* "Carol of the ____"

A Young Mag is Gone

It has come to my attention that Will Shortz's Wordplay, the first puzzle magazine in which I have ever gotten published, is being discontinued due to poor sales. I am ever grateful to Eric Berlin for turning my random conversation with him about my new puzzle type Pent Words into an opportunity to be published, and to Ian Livengood for his helpful correspondence, and I hope that I might get published in another magazine using the knowledge and skills I've gained. In the meanwhile, I have decided to offer a compilation of 14 unpublished Will Shortz's Wordplay submissions:
1 Double Trouble
2 Framelinks puzzles
1 Flower Power
1 Letter Perfect
4 Pathfinders
3 Pent Words
1 Snake Crisscross
1 Something Different
The ZIP file includes all 14 puzzles and their answers, in the formats they were originally submitted (with the exception of the redaction of my mailing address). I release these puzzles under a pay what you want model: if you think they're worth something, send me some money via PayPal at glmathgrant[at]gmail[dot]com.

So, what of my future? Where will my puzzles appear next? There's Games World of Puzzles, but I could never figure out whether people take that publication seriously or not; it has somewhat a reputation for errata and reprinting puzzles, and the newest incarnation doesn't seem to offer the "Laundry" and "Eureka" sections where readers report broken puzzles. Oddly enough, despite being a bit of a gamer, I don't want games and puzzles in the same magazine if I can help it; I'd rather get my games from BoardGameGeek and my puzzles from a magazine filled to the brim with wordplay and logic goodness. At least Games finally figured out that you shouldn't have your answers section in the middle of the magazine, especially when the last page of it faces the first page of some article someone might want to read. They have some writers' guidelines, but given how the rest of the site looks, I cannot be guaranteed that it's up to date (does Games World of Puzzles have fake ads anymore?). Plus, many years ago, I submitted a Masyu without even the courtesy of a rejection letter, which is very discouraging, and I don't yet have the hubris to expect a response if I submit something again.

I've always liked the idea of writing a Sit & Solve book for Pent Words, but I'm not sure whether Puzzlewright Press is reachable, given that a colleague with much higher standing than me pitched a Sit & Solve book without getting a response for over a year, and that their Twitter account has been very stale. I might have a better chance of getting a book of my puzzles published via the Kickstarter route that David Millar took for his Paranormal Puzzle Pack.

Until I find another publication venue, here's to hoping that Thomas Snyder gets adjusted soon, so my logic puzzles can once again be enjoyed by the world.

Wordy Wednesday 49: Words Without Friends

WORDY WEDNESDAY #46
TABLETOP MATH (answer)
It's been three weeks, so time to unveil the answer to this puzzle. If you still wish to solve it yourself, please go here for the puzzle, or here for hints. Here's a list of people who solved it:
Adam Weaver **
Bryce Herdt **
Edderiofer He *
Jack Lance **
James McGowan **
John Bulten **
Lewis Chen **
Mark Tilford **
Ryan Faley *
Walker Anderson **
And the third contest winner is Ryan Faley! Congratulations!

WORDY WEDNESDAY #47
BIG HELTER SKELTER (answer)
It's been two weeks, so time to unveil the answer to this puzzle. If you still wish to solve it yourself, please go here for the normal version of the puzzle, or here for the easier version of the puzzle. Here's a list of people who solved it:
Adam Weaver **
Bo Green **
Bryce Herdt **
Christian H.P. **
Edderiofer He **
Giovanni Pagano **
Izak & Penni Bulten **
Jack Lance **
James McGowan **
John Bulten *
Lewis Chen **
Mark Tilford **
Peter Abide **
Ryan Faley **
Sam Levitin **
Tim Harrod **

WORDY WEDNESDAY #48
FRAMELINKS 2 (hint)
14 people have solved last week's puzzle. Haven't solved it yet? Here's an easier version. Send your solutions to glmathgrant[at]gmail[dot]com within the next week to appear on the solvers list and be recognized for your puzzle prowess. Good luck, solvers!

WORDY WEDNESDAY #49
WORDS WITHOUT FRIENDS
This game of word solitaire is inspired by Solicross, and allows me to get out of writing an actual puzzle! Yay!

You have 16 turns to score as many points as possible by building words on the grid. Start by taking the first 7 letters from the LETTER LIST. Form an English word using two or more letters, and place it reading across (from left to right) or down (from top to bottom) in the grid, with one of the letters covering the shaded cell. On each successive turn, cross out the letters you used and replace them with the next letters from the LETTER LIST, and then play a new word using some or all of those letters. As in Scrabble, you can play at right angles to a previous word (either incorporating a letter from it or expanding it) or parallel to a previous word, but must adjoin some previous word; adjoining letters must always form words in crossword fashion, and all letters used in a single turn must be part of a single word.

Every turn, you score for the words you made on that turn. The score for a word is the sum of all the numbers it covers (whether those letters were played on that turn or not); multiple words formed in a single turn are added up together (with shared letters counting twice). If you use all 64 letters within 16 turns, give yourself 50 extra points.

All words will be checked against the Official Scrabble Players Dictionary Fourth Edition, the newest one I have. (Take note: this is the bowdlerized edition!) Nine-letter words will be checked against m-w.com; proper names, abbreviations, and the like are forbidden.

All solvers who score at least 350 points will be entered to win a silly booby prize. (We're probably talking Pokémon cards here.) All solvers who score at least the median number of points will be entered into a second booby prize drawing. Send your finished game (with a score of at least 350 points; a picture of the finished grid and a list of words formed each turn should suffice) to glmathgrant[at]gmail[dot]com. You may submit multiple times during the next two weeks; only your highest score will be counted. Have fun!


Wordy Wednesday 48: Framelinks 2

WORDY WEDNESDAY #46
TABLETOP MATH (hints)
It's been two weeks, and the number of solvers for this puzzle has increased to 8. The second contest winner, chosen randomly from among these solvers, is: Lewis Chen! Congratulations! As promised, here are some hints for this very difficult puzzle, including a word search with all of the game names in it. Solve within the next week to be entered to win signed copies of the Winter 2015 and Spring 2015 issues of Will Shortz's Wordplay!

WORDY WEDNESDAY #47
BIG HELTER SKELTER (easier)
15 people have solved last week's puzzle. Haven't solved it yet? Here's an easier version. Send your solutions to glmathgrant[at]gmail[dot]com within the next week to appear on the solvers list and be recognized for your puzzle prowess. Good luck, solvers!

WORDY WEDNESDAY #48
FRAMELINKS 2
Fill in the empty squares in the diagram with the given letters to form common words. Arrange the letters in the 8 shaded squares to form the final answer word.

AAAA B DD EEEEEE GGG HHH IIIIIIII LL M NNNN OOOO PP RRRRRRR SSSS TTTTTTTT WW YYY

Grant's Review Corner: Volume 12

In this episode of Grant's Review Corner, I review the entire freemium model of gaming. Okay, so this is more of a rant than a review, but my feelings have been fermenting in my mind for quite a while, and in the wake of Nintendo offering not one, but two freemium Pokémon games (a move which is making a boycott seem severely tempting right about now), I feel the need to pitch in my two cents on this genre (as opposed to my 99 cents).

The freemium business model sounds good on the surface: you get to play a game for free, and only pay money if you want to. It's akin to the shareware model in that way, where you play a demo of a game, and then you can pay for the full game. Everett Kaser Software has run on the shareware model since the 1990's, and as I've let on before, I derive enjoyment from his games, somehow. What's good in theory, though, isn't always good in practice, and the freemium model is no exception. I hold the freemium business model in about as much esteem as Richard Dawkins holds religion, or David Morgan-Mar holds Monopoly.

Wordy Wednesday 47: Big Helter Skelter

WORDY WEDNESDAY #45
PENT WORDS 9 (answer)
It's been two weeks, so time to unveil the answer to this puzzle. If you still wish to solve it yourself, please go here for the normal version of the puzzle, or here for the easier version of the puzzle. Here's a list of people who solved it:
Adam Weaver **
Bo Green *
Bryce Herdt **
Edderiofer He **
Gavriel Hirsch *
Izak Bulten *
Jack Bross **
James McGowan **
John Bulten **
M. Sean Molley **
Mark Tilford **
Peter Abide **
Ryan Faley **
Sam Levitin **
Tim Harrod **
Walker Anderson *

WORDY WEDNESDAY #46
TABLETOP MATH
A shockingly low 5 people have solved last week's puzzle. As mentioned before, this puzzle is a contest; the first contest winner, chosen randomly from the first week's solvers, is: Adam Weaver! As promised, there will not be an easy version of the puzzle this week. However, note that I only promised not to post any hints after one week; I said nothing about two weeks. Yes, this puzzle contest will run for a third week! I didn't exactly plan on this, but I want to see more people solve this puzzle. Enter to win signed copies of the Winter 2015 and Spring 2015 issues of Will Shortz's Wordplay!

IZAK BULTEN HAS A BLOG NOW!
My blog's youngest reader would like to direct you towards his new blog, where he may also be the youngest word search constructor on the Internet. Maybe he should submit that record to RecordSetter. . . . :)

WORDY WEDNESDAY #47
BIG HELTER SKELTER
My tribute to Brendan Emmett Quigley's Helter Skelter puzzles in Will Shortz's Wordplay. Every answer starts at the indicated number, and then moves in the direction of the next number (but may or may not stop there). The direction of the last answer is to be determined by the solver. Rearrange the letters in the shaded spaces to get the final answer word.
[Editorial note: I recently learned that BEQ had a Marching Bands Kickstarter that I didn't notice because I don't follow his blog all that much. (I guess a super-difficult themeless crossword puzzle every week isn't my thing.) I'd consider backing a Helter Skelter Kickstarter, especially if the puzzles were bigger than 8x8 (or a single puzzle that's the world's largest Helter Skelter). I want to see what BEQ could do with longer entries! I mean, sure, there are lots of unches, but there are also lots of over-checked letters and interesting overlaps.]

1. Former Disney CEO Michael
2. ____ of passage
3. Language of Bangkok
4. Character who sings, “What's going on?”: hyph.
5. Spar on a ship
6. Sulu portrayer
7. Lends a hand
8. Drill ____
9. Exit
10. The Hills Have ____ (Wes Craven film)
11. “Nobody doesn't like” this dessert brand: 2 wds.
12. Islamic ruler
13. Give a new moniker to
14. Stat: abbr.
15. Billy Joel song which opens, “You have to learn to pace yourself”
16. Snake
17. Ripped
18. California ____ (claymation singers in 80's ads)
19. See clue 20
20. Word 19 and Roy, for example
21. The Road to Wigan Pier author George
22. Erroneous
23. Game played with a strum bar and fret buttons: 2 wds.
24. Three-line verse of Japanese origin
25. Sword of Japanese origin
26. Consumed
27. Notorious 50's quiz show: 2 wds.
28. Family surname in Beethoven
29. Hardships
30. Sullies
31. Quarterback ____
32. Happen consequently
33. Will Shortz, to Will Shortz's Wordplay
34. Set up, as a new computer program
35. Life and ____
36. First song sung in Beauty and the Beast
37. Fantastic score for Nicklaus
38. Real ____
39. El primer mes del año
40. Extend a magazine subscription
41. Dihydrogen monoxide, to a German
42. Impatient
43. ____ toast
44. ____ Wednesday (if you think the answer is WORDY, you overestimate the author's vanity)
45. There are none of these on a bald head
46. Jamaican music genre
47. Tab, for example
48. Tropical tuber
49. Breaking Bad substance

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