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Puzzle 457: Prev-Arrow-Cation 6

No comment.

Puzzle 456: Spirits of Serpentine 2

No comment.
 

Puzzle 455: Spirits of Serpentine 1

No comment.

Rules -- Spirits of Serpentine

Spirits of Serpentine was invented by the Japanese puzzle company Nikoli (under the name Hebi-Ichigo) in early 2009.
1. Locate several snakes in the white cells of the grid. Each snake consists of five cells, numbered 1 (the head) through 5 (the tail). Consecutively numbered cells within a snake must share an edge.
2. No two snakes may overlap or share an edge.
3. No snake may see another snake. A snake's eyes are on the side of its head opposite the number 2 cell. It can only see in that direction, in a straight line, up to the edge of the grid or the nearest black cell (whichever is closer). (See this illustrated example.)

4. A cell containing a number and an arrow represents the first number encountered in the row or column pointed at by the arrow, up to the edge of the grid or the nearest black cell (whichever is closer). A 0 means that no snake is encountered in this area.

Monday Mutant 49: Streaming Content (all 3's)

In this Streaming Content puzzle, only the number 3 is shown. A question mark represents a number that isn't 3. The rules are otherwise unchanged.

Puzzle 452: Pearls of Wisdom 44

If it looks like the givens are arranged with any rhyme or reason whatsoever, then you are very, very mistaken.

Monday Mutant 48: Battleships (all 3's)

Ten ships (as indicated below the grid: one four-cell ship, two three-cell ships, three two-cell ships, and four one-cell ships) are hidden in the grid. The ships may be rotated from the orientations shown (without changing the numbers), but may not overlap or occupy cells which share a corner or an edge. A number 3 to the right of a row or below a column indicates that three cells in that row or column are occupied by ships; the number of occupied cells in a row or column without a number must not be 3. Find the ships.
Note to solvers (courtesy of Jonah): read the rules, not just the title.

Grant's Review Corner: Volume 2

I'm sorry to post this on a Monday and risk taking attention away from today's Monday Mutant, but I felt it was necessary.

Not too long ago, I got the following e-mail:

Hi,

I’m an incurable puzzler but found that Sudoku was getting too easy.  So I wrote a new puzzle app for iPhone, [name redacted], which is available in the iPhone store for the first time today.  ([link redacted])

The easiest level is kid friendly.  The hardest level (with almost 4 quadrillion, quadrillion, quadrillion possible answers) is “Insane”.  The game is called [name redacted] and, like Sudoku, it challenges us to place a set of numbers in the correct positions on a square grid.  In this case, “correct” means that once placed, the numbers add up to the sums shown for each row, column and diagonal.

A 3 x 3 grid isn’t much of a challenge.  A 6 x 6 grid is incredibly challenging. (Yes, hints are available)

I would love it if you would review the puzzle in your blog.  I would be happy to send you a promo code to download and test it.


I've never considered myself an expert at constructive criticism, but I think I'll make an exception for this app and try my hand at reviewing it. In fact, looking at the iTunes store, I see that you have since released a second puzzle game app, and I will throw in a review of that one as a free bonus! Unfortunately, Mr. Incurable Puzzler, as you might have already surmised from that fact that I have redacted your name and your apps' names, it's not going to be a positive one.

Monday Mutant 47: Fencing Match (all 3's)

In this Fencing Match puzzle, a 3 has been placed in every cell which could legally contain one. The number of edges of an empty cell which are part of the loop must not be 3. The rules are otherwise unchanged.
With apologies to MellowMelon (AKA Palmer Mebane).

In unrelated news, Sudoku Xtra issue 11 is out! It contains five of my puzzles, including 3 Battleships puzzles and a mutant Seek and Spell! It also contains two enjoyable Heyawake puzzles created by Gareth Moore himself, so even if you absolutely hate my puzzles, maybe you'll still enjoy something in there.

Monday Mutant 46: Danny Boy's Pipes

Place a piece of pipe in each square of the grid. Each pipe piece consists of two or more pipe sections which connect that piece to some or all of the squares which share an edge with the piece. Thus, there are four different shapes for a pipe piece: two sections at an angle (an L-bend), two sections in a line (an I-straight), three sections in a T-junction, and four sections in an X-junction. All of the pipe pieces must form a single connected unit, and there may not be any loose ends (if one piece has a section connecting to an adjacent square, the piece in that square must also have a section connecting back). Letters in a square represent the shapes (L-bend, I-straight, T-junction, X-junction) of all of the pieces which are connected to the piece on that square. (See here for an illustrated example.)

Monday Mutant 45: Danny Boy's Pipes

Place a piece of pipe in each square of the grid. Each pipe piece consists of two or more pipe sections which connect that piece to some or all of the squares which share an edge with the piece. Thus, there are four different shapes for a pipe piece: two sections at an angle (an L-bend), two sections in a line (an I-straight), three sections in a T-junction, and four sections in an X-junction. All of the pipe pieces must form a single connected unit, and there may not be any loose ends (if one piece has a section connecting to an adjacent square, the piece in that square must also have a section connecting back). Letters in a square represent the shapes (L-bend, I-straight, T-junction, X-junction) of all of the pieces which are connected to the piece on that square. (See here for an illustrated example.)
This puzzle type, which first appeared on my old blog, is based on Knarly Works by Everett Kaser Software.

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