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Monday Mutant 21: Polyominous / Battleships

Ten ships (as indicated below the grid: one four-cell ship, two three-cell ships, three two-cell ships, and four one-cell ships) are hidden in the grid. The ships may be rotated from the orientations shown (without changing the numbers), but may not overlap or occupy cells which share a corner or an edge. A number to the right of a row or below a column indicates how many cells in that row or column are occupied by ships. The numbers on these ships also function as clues in a Polyominous puzzle. None of the numbers already present in the grid are part of the ships. Locate the ships and solve the Polyominous puzzle.
Today's Monday Mutant was inspired by the ever-so-inspirational Thomas Snyder.

7 comments

stigant said...

Very nice. Totally out of curiosity, why do you use a different grid style for Polyominous puzzles?

Grant Fikes said...

stigant: People solving Polyominous in an image editor seem to like to color the cells according to their numbers (for example, all of the 1's are one color, all of the 2's are another color, etc.), so the grid lines are designed to allow individual cells to be flood-filled. Contrariwise, in Pearls of Wisdom, for example, the ability to flood-fill individual cells is less useful, but the ability to flood-fill the interior and the exterior of the loop is more useful (if the loop has only one of each, then that proves there's only one loop, and not two separate ones).

stigant said...

What I meant was compared to Streaming Content or Room and Reason both of which are typically solved using flood fill as well, but which have straight grid-lines rather than the jagged ones you use for Polyominous. Incidently, on Pearls of Wisdom, I use flood fill to fill the path itself rather than the inside/outside of the path, but I guess that explains why you use the dashed lines.

Grant Fikes said...

stigant: When done on paper (which some people do, using something called a "printer"), Polyominous puzzles are solved by drawing lines AND writing numbers, so having dotted lines (or light gray ones) is useful to people doing them on paper. Pencil lines stand out more against dotted or gray grid lines than against normal grid lines. In Streaming Content, normal grid lines are sufficient.

Grant Fikes said...

Addendum: For the most part, my presentation is as similar to Nikoli's as I can get. On paper, all of Nikoli's Fillomino and Masyu puzzles use dotted lines. My first two Fillomino puzzles on my old blog used dotted lines, but I've used jagged flood-fill friendly lines ever since at the request of some solvers who wanted to use flood-fill without manually drawing solid lines over the dotted lines.

Anonymous said...

Love the variation. Good fun. Liked the top left breakin ... very cute.

Thanks.

Ken

Scott said...

Nice variation. And I appreciate your Paint friendly renderings :).

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