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Fillomino-Fillia Preview Series: Classic Fillomino

This is a classic Fillomino (AKA Polyominous), operating by the classic rules.

Answer entry: Enter the units digits of each square in the marked rows and columns, from left to right for rows and from top to bottom for columns.

Highlight to see the answer: 8887771445 7772272554

You may notice that this image looks different from my usual images. That's because it was created by MellowMelon using a program (although the puzzle represented by the image was, of course, lovingly crafted by yours truly). This is how all of the images will look on the test, meaning you won't be able to tell which puzzles I made and which ones MellowMelon made, drastically increasing the difficulty of the test! (Or. . . not. :) )

10 comments

Jonah said...

I was this close to complaining on behalf of those who solve by flood tool before I took a closer look. Nice.

Grant Fikes said...

Jonah: MellowMelon has rendered his Fillomino images like that ever since his blog started having regular readers, at the request of said readers. It's an interesting alternative to how I render my images. . . .

Projectyl said...

That raises a good point: will the actual test be flood-fillable? It doesn't look like the sample grids in the instruction booklet are, at least.

Grant Fikes said...

Projectyl: The images on the actual test will all look like the images in this preview series, so the images in the puzzle booklet PDF will have off-white pixels (#FEFEFE) separating the white (#FFFFFF) cells, allowing flood fill to be used easily. (If you're using a program that lets you set the "tolerance" level from 0% through 100%, then you will need to use a tolerance level no higher than 5%.)

This in turn raises a question (at least for me) regarding the legality of using an image editor in the first place; the definition of tools forbidden in the US Puzzle Competition seems to include anything besides whatever hardware and software you use to view and print the PDF, a writing instrument, and whatever hardware and software you use to input answers you found using the aforementioned tools. However, this would admittedly be difficult to enforce in the environment of the USPC or LMI (as opposed to the environment of the WPC or WSC, where the security and the puzzle community's incredible sense of honor proved to be Eugene Varshavsky's undoing). LMI also seems to be somewhat forgiving regarding certain errors in answer input, and you'll be given full credit for things such as inverting 0's and 1's in your answer to a puzzle that involves identifying black cells and white cells; I've never participated in the USPC, so I don't know if they do that.

Projectyl said...

Hm. I hadn't thought of that. I guess one could argue that an image editor in this case is a "writing instrument", but I'm not sure if that'd hold up.

Grant Fikes said...

For that matter, is it cheating to use a mechanical pencil, or a mechanical pencil sharpener? Maybe it's cheating to use a pencil at all; next time I compete in LMI, I will have to solve the puzzles entirely in my head.

Anonymous said...

Although I usually solve the fillominos from this site using a fill command in Paint, I'm not particularly tempted to do so for the test. Largely because if all I have is a nice color coded quilt without the digits written in, I'm about 90% likely to screw up in reading off the digits when entering my answer. Pencil is a good way to solve these anyway -- I'm just usually too lazy to print.
- Jack

mellowmelon said...

Back in 2010 when I told Deb that I didn't compete due to lack of printer access, he noted that some Indian players had the same problem and instead would copy puzzles into image editors and compete by doing that (this was an option I decided not to go with). So that suggests image editors are perfectly legal for LMI.

Given the presence of things like Spot the Differences or Find the Pairs, the USPC may be different.

Grant Fikes said...

You have a good point, Palmer. I had sort of forgotten that those kinds of puzzles are on the USPC. Logic Masters India is focused more on logic than visual acuity, so tools that would make a "spot the differences" puzzle easier wouldn't be so bad for a test of Fillomino, say.

Anonymous said...

I don't always use the same color codes, but I often use the resistor color code. (which I now remember after several puzzles...)

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